Nanna Melland, 1969.  Photography: Morten Brun
Filomena Silvano. Photography: Rights reserved. Cortesy Filomena Silvano
Filomena Silvano. Photo: Rights reserved. Cortesy Filomena Silvano.
Nanna Melland, 1969. Photography: Morten Brun
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            BIENNIAL CLOSING CEREMONY
 
STORIES OF JEWELLERY FROM THE NORTH
Lecture with Nanna Melland (NO)
19 November, Friday
18h–19h
 
WE WEAR CLOTHES TO BECOME HUMAN.  BUT WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE HUMAN?
Lecture with Filomena Silvano
20 November, Saturday
15h–16h
Brotéria

BOOK/CATALOGUE LAUNCH
COLD SWEAT: BODY, FEAR, PROTECTION
Bárbara Coutinho, Cristina Filipe, Teresa Morna and João Norton de Matos.
Moderate by Marta Costa Reis
20 November, Saturday
16h30–18h
Slide
Nanna Melland, «Heart Charm», 2000. Photography. Cortesy and photografy Nanna Melland.
STORIES OF JEWELLERY FROM THE NORTH
This lecture will take you on a journey to one of Europe’s darkest corners: Norway. A land of Vikings and the indigenous Sami, it is a country of huge natural contrasts that shift between dark and cold to light-filled insomniac summers.
Warm clothes will protect you from the cold, but there is no protection from the darkness. It will seep into your mind like a thick fog. As nature hibernates, people try their best to make it through the winter. It is not an exercise for beginners. For most Norwegians, it is a lifelong challenge.
Under these conditions, a small but thriving community of jewellery makers create their work alongside Norway’s other creative expressions such as its famed black metal bands, the poet Henrik Ibsen, the painter Edvard Munch, and the queen of contemporary jewellery, Tone Vigeland. The darkness and cold are certainly a powerful force for creativity, as magical as the colours of the Aurora Borealis pulsating in the sky!
 
NANNA MELLAND (1969, Oslo, Norway) holds degrees from the Academy of Fine arts in Munich, a master’s degree from the University of Oslo in Social Anthropology and History of Religion, and is a journeyman goldsmith. In 2017 Melland was guest professor at Burg Gibichenstein in Halle, Germany, and is now based in Oslo, Norway.
In 2008 Melland received the Norwegian Craft prize. She works with various materials and explores a wide variety of subject matter, including intrauterine devices (IUDs), gold nails, cast pigs’ hearts, orchids in lead, aluminium airplanes and atom bomb rings in tin. Despite its eclecticism, her work paradoxically attains a coherent whole, and is represented in Nordenfjeldske Arts and Craft museum in Trondheim, Norway.
Melland has taken part in many group and solo exhibitions in museum and galleries around the world, including at the Pinakotek Moderne in Munich, the Schmuck fair, the Museum of Modern Art in Arnheim, the Paris Museum of Modern Art, the Jewellery Museum in Pforzheim, the New York Museum of Arts and Design, and The Dowse Art Museum in New Zealand.
Slide
Louboutin and David Lynch, 2007. “Fetish Fakhir” ballerinas. Photo Filomena Silvano
WE WEAR CLOTHES TO BECOME HUMAN. BUT WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE HUMAN?
Why do we wear clothes? To become human. This is usually the accepted answer. The issue is to know what to become human means. In the so-called traditional societies, the metamorphosis hasn’t severed our connection with other living beings, but it has in what we call the modern world.
What has changed with the emergence of the modern body was the internal (and universal) logic of identity construction processes in which the body is inserted. This has resulted in greater mindfulness leading us to apprehend our bodies as something exterior (my body) we can shape, a product of our own will (and power).
Are we now facing a turning point? Everything points to that. We still don’t know how to, but we´re trying to reconnect with the entities with which we share Earth’s delicate living crust. The Covid crisis has showed us that either we share our existence with the other beings or we won’t exist at all. We have yet to know how to reinvent our bodies within this new position of mere holobionts. Filomena Silvano
 
FILOMENA SILVANO (Marinha Grande, 1960) is an anthropologist, professor at the Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas da Universidade Nova de Lisboa (NOVA FCSH) and member of the Centro em Rede em Antropologia (CRIA-NOVA FCSH). In her work, she establishes a relationship between issues of identity and the study of space, material culture and cultural expression. Filomena Silvano joined several research teams and worked with the film director João Pedro Rodrigues on four documentaries. She is the author of the books«Territórios da Identidade», «Antropologia do Espaço», «De casa em casa: sobre um encontro entre etnografia e cinema» and «Antropologia da Moda» (in Press).